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Reverse Pivot on Swing Fault

Reverse pivot on Swing Fault – The reverse pivot occurs in the backswing when the golfer straightens his or her back leg and shifts their body weight to the front leg and the upper body tilts toward the target instead of away from the
target (see figure 2.4 for an example of what a reverse pivot looks like).

Reverse Pivot on Swing Fault

This motion inhibits the amount of torque a golfer can create on the backswing because they cannot rotate their body, forcing them to make compensations in their swing on the downswing. This reverse pivot, or reverse weight shift, as it is sometimes called, is due to compensation caused by weakness of the back leg’s hip and thigh muscles, specifically the gluteus maximus muscles (buttocks) and quadriceps.

Physical limitations that can cause a reverse pivot to include the following:

  1. Inability to separate the upper body from the lower body
  2. Limited spinal mobility
  3. Limited trunk rotation
  4. Limited internal hip rotation
  5. Lack of core stability
  6. S-posture
  7. Lack of lower body strength
  8. Lack of balance

If these muscles are weak, the golfer will not be able to physically handle shifting their weight correctly onto their back leg on the backswing. The golfer will tend to straighten the back leg by locking the knee, which helps support the body weight, and then the golfer will tend to shift the weight to the front leg to maintain balance. A reverse pivot forces the golfer to start the downswing with the upper body, denying them the leverage to maximize clubhead speed. A reverse pivot will also put a tremendous amount of pressure on the lower spine, which can cause pain or injury.

Reverse Pivot on Swing Fault

Figure 2.4

Sway on Swing Fault

The following four physical limitations can cause sway:

  1. Weak gluteal muscles (buttocks)
  2. Tight hips
  3. Lack of spinal mobility
  4. Lack of trunk mobility
Reverse Pivot on Swing Fault

Figure 2.5

Sway is a golf term that indicates a sideways movement of the lower body on the backswing (see figure 2.5 for a demonstration of what sway looks like). Ideally, the hips are to turn during the backswing, with only a slight lateral motion. A sway indicates excessive lateral motion with the lower body. A sway also limits the weight shift and may cause the golfer to move his or her head off the ball. Golfers that sway may also lock or straighten their back knee as they start the backswing. This motion inhibits the amount of torque a golfer can create on the backswing because they cannot rotate their body, forcing them to make compensations in their swing on the downswing.

A sway, whether it is on the backswing or downswing (a downswing sway is sometimes called “slide”) can be directly attributed to weakness or inhibition of the gluteal muscles (buttocks) or hips. The buttocks are the principal muscles used in supporting the body on one leg. If they are weak or there is a delay in the contraction of these muscles, the pelvis will sway in the direction of the loading of the weight, and there is a tremendous amount of stored energy lost. If these muscles are weak, the golfer will slide to shift their weight on the backswing and downswing instead of rotating the lower body.

One of the most widely used terms in golf instruction is the idea of the “one-piece” takeaway. Many golf instructors believe that the club, arms, and body move away from the ball in a solid one-piece motion. But if you have some sort of physical limitation in your hips, knees, or torso, practicing this concept can cause you to sway.

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